Geography of Tibet

Geography of Tibet

Geographically, Tibet can be divided into three parts: the east, south and north.

East Tibet: The tortuous ways of Nu, Lancang and Jinsha Rivers cut through the majestic Hengduan Mountain range, creating breathtaking landscapes of high mountains and deep canyons. Higher in the north and lower in the south, the mountain and canyon area in the eastern part of Tibet presents a wide diversity of fauna and flora as well as a unique combination of snow-capped peaks and verdant hillside forests.

South Tibet: Mt. Everest soars to a height of some 8,848m skyward and together with several other mountain ranges with an average altitude of 6,000m, constitutes the Himalayan mountain range as the highest mountainous area in the south of Tibet. With the higher western end of this area being dry and freezing, the eastern region is temperate, humid and densely forested. Meanwhile, between the Himalayas and the Gangdise, the Yarlung Tsangpo River winds its way through this region leaving a fertile agricultural area of lakes, basins and river valleys along its course.

North Tibet: Vast plateaus in the north of Tibet, specifically around the Kunlun Mountain, the Tanggula Mountain and between the Gangdise and the Nyainqentanglha Mountains, cover 2/3 of the total area of Tibet. Dotted with numerous lakes and basins, the plateaus, among which Changtang Plateau is the best known, provide rich animal husbandry products for other parts of Tibet.